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KBIC, law enforcement work together to end human trafficking

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community brought community and law enforcement together Thursday night...
The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community brought community and law enforcement together Thursday night as part of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women month.(wluc)
Published: May. 19, 2022 at 10:42 PM EDT
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BARAGA, Mich. (WLUC) - The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community brought community and law enforcement together Thursday night as part of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women month.

The KBIC showed the film ‘Ring of Silence’ and hosted a question and answer session with a panel. One of the panel speakers says it’s important to remember human trafficking can happen anywhere.

“These issues aren’t just something that you see on the news. These things are issues that happen in your own area. They happen in your backyard,” said JLyn Jorgenson, KBIC Assistant Prosecuting Attorney.

The ‘Ring of Silence’ movie addresses how social media can be used in human trafficking.

“We are hoping that by sharing information of this type, and with law enforcement with us, we can change peoples’ decisions,” said Carole LaPointe, Team Lead, Niimigimiwang Transitional Home.

The president of the U.P. Human Trafficking Task Force says it’s important to raise awareness because Indigenous Peoples’ are at significantly higher risk.

“Disproportionally the Native Indian communities experience tenfold the risk,” said Stephanie Graef.

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community started the process of ending the silence for human trafficking victims.

“It’s important to be aware of what’s going on and it’s also very important to know the signs of human trafficking,” Jorgenson said.

If you notice a potential victim, call the U.P. Human Trafficking Helpline at 906-299-9243.

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