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Two nonprofits fight invasive plants

A battle against nature, or at least the wrong kinds.
Jill Fischer from the Keweenaw Land Trust shows what knapweed looks like for both of its common...
Jill Fischer from the Keweenaw Land Trust shows what knapweed looks like for both of its common types found in the Keweenaw.(WLUC)
Published: Sep. 20, 2021 at 9:24 PM EDT
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CALUMET, Mich. (WLUC) - Two Keweenaw nonprofits are joining forces to stop the spread of invasive plants locally.

The Keweenaw Land Trust and the Keweenaw Wild Ones are beginning the process at one of the Land Trust’s reserves – the Boston Pond.

The quickest spreading invasive species at the pond is knapweed.

“It puts chemicals in the ground that prevent other plants from germinating,” said Marcia Goodrich, Keweenaw Wild Ones chapter president.

Knapweed also grows long taproots, which make it likely to survive and spread during droughts, unlike other native plants that don’t have as deep of roots. It also makes them difficult to pull out effectively.

“Just like you’d never expect a farmer to not ever have to weed his field,” said Jill Fischer, Keweenaw Land Trust botanist and project manager. “You have to look at your lands and see what weeds are coming in and protect the place from bad weeds.”

The groups plan to host a community event or two by the end of the year for education and demonstration on how to help mitigate invasive plants in the Keweenaw.

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