Finding the mountain bike "local line"

Harri Leigh Mountain bikers love riding the illusive "local line." One new bike guide company promises to help them find it.

Mountain bikers love riding the illusive "local line." One new bike guide company promises to help them find it.

"Out on every trail, there is a line that's known as the local line, that a local may only know," said Tyler Gauthier, owner of Local Lines Mountain Bike Guide Company. "It may be the fastest line; it may be the funnest line. So anybody that's not familiar with the trail system might not even know it was there. A local's going to know it's there. Sometimes [it's] known as myth, sometimes real."

The Local Lines Mountain Bike Guide Company, which launched last week, offers a local's knowledge of area trails. With 150 miles of singletrack bike trails in Marquette County, there are bound to be a few local lines.

"We have the RAMBA trail system, which is the Range Area Mountain Bike Association in Ishpeming. We have the NTN, which is the Noquemanon Trail Network in Marquette, and then we have the Harlow Lake area," Gauthier said. "So we're just a complement to those three systems."

In recent years, the Upper Peninsula's reputation as a mountain biking destination has grown. National Geographic ranked Copper Harbor as one of the top 20 best mountain bike towns in the country in May.

Gauthier said more cyclists are coming to the U.P. because local trails offer an experience that goes beyond biking.

"Each trail has its own uniqueness to it," Gauthier said. "You go to Ishpeming or RAMBA. They have a mining history that everywhere you ride, you're constantly surrounded by the mining ruins or the mining pits."

Rates for Local Lines trail rides vary depending on the size of your group, but you can expect to spend around $50 to $75 per person for a four-hour session. You can bring your own bike or rent one from a local shop.

You can visit Local Lines' website here.



 
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