Careers in Energy Week set to shine light on wide-ranging, rewarding careers in Michigan’s energy industry

LANSING, Mich. (WLUC) - As the energy sector transforms to cleaner, greener generation technologies, Michigan job seekers should consider careers in the energy sector to help the state’s economy continue growing and becoming more competitive, Gov. Rick Snyder said while proclaiming Oct. 16-20 Careers in Energy Week.

Michigan’s energy industry accounts for nearly 100,000 jobs with demand projected to increase by 9 percent through 2024. The increase shows a vital need for those with Professional Trades skills to consider the sector and grow training in the STEM subjects of science, technology, engineering and math and the Professional Trades to better prepare Michiganders to close the gap in the workforce pipeline.

“Affordable, reliable energy is fundamental to maintaining a great environment for Michiganders to live, work and play in,” Snyder said. “I want to encourage students and job seekers to explore these in-demand jobs and, in turn, help close the growing talent gap in our state.”

Snyder is joined by Wanda M. Stokes, director of the Michigan Talent Investment Agency, Consumers Energy, DTE Energy and The Michigan Energy Workforce Development Consortium in raising awareness for the in-demand jobs across the industry in Michigan.

“Industry-led partnerships, like the Michigan Energy Workforce Development Consortium, are a strategic way that TIA and its partners are addressing Michigan’s talent gap,” Stokes said. “Partnerships like this bring awareness to good-paying, stable careers. With events and activities like Careers in Energy Week, we are priming the talent pipeline to fill jobs of the future.”

During Careers in Energy Week, Consumers Energy, DTE Energy and the Lansing Board of Water and Light will be hosting tours for local career and technical education students and Jobs for Michigan Graduates participants.

The Michigan Energy Workforce Development Consortium is a coalition of more than 50 organizations representing industry, education, workforce, labor and veterans dedicated to identifying and acting on workforce issues that are crucial to the health of Michigan’s energy industry. To focus on hiring Michigan students, the consortium maintains a presence within schools and colleges.

“A strong talent pipeline is key to building and sustaining Michigan’s energy industry,” Amber Fogarty, learning facilitator for Consumers Energy and Career Awareness Task Force Lead for the MEWDC said. “Careers in Energy Week is all about generating excitement for jobs in an often-overlooked industry, and creating meaningful career pathways for students.”

People interested in a career in energy should visit Pure Michigan Talent Connect or visit your local Michigan Works! agency. Additional information about the Michigan Energy Workforce Development Consortium is available here.



 
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